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News: ARTICLE | Immerse Yourself In Art At The Kemper’s Cafe Sebastienne, July 12, 2024 - Dawnya Bartsch for Kansas City Magazine

ARTICLE | Immerse Yourself In Art At The Kemper’s Cafe Sebastienne

July 12, 2024 - Dawnya Bartsch for Kansas City Magazine

PHOTOGRAPHY BY ANNA PETROW.

Have you dreamed of sipping rosé with Matisse or dining with Duchamp? It’s all possible at the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art’s Cafe Sebastienne. The cafe itself is a piece of art, and the dining hall and its patrons are an integral part of the art installation. 

The Cafe Sebastienne dining room is lined from floor to ceiling with paintings by the late American artist Frederick J. Brown, who died in 2012. The installation, called The History of Art, features 110 oil paintings, each representing an important movement or figure in art throughout the ages. The works cover the cafe’s seven irregular walls, and they can cleverly be identified via a “map” found on the back of the menu. Dining in the cafe is an immersive experience.

“The series reflects the words of my mentor Willem de Kooning, who once told me, ‘Remember that art is a very old profession—it began with a shaman in a cave,’” Brown said at the time of the permanent installation in 1999.

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News: NEWS | ART BASEL MIAMI BEACH REVEALS EXHIBITORS FOR 2024 EDITION, July 11, 2024 - News Desk at Artforum

NEWS | ART BASEL MIAMI BEACH REVEALS EXHIBITORS FOR 2024 EDITION

July 11, 2024 - News Desk at Artforum

The organizers of Art Basel have announced the 283 galleries set to participate in this year’s Miami Beach fair, slated to take place at the Miami Beach Convention Center December 6–8, with preview days December 4 and 5. Hailing from thirty-four countries and territories, the exhibiting galleries include thirty-two first-time participants, the most since 2008. The Americas are strongly represented, with nearly two thirds of participants coming from the United States, Canada, Mexico, Brazil, Argentina, Colombia, Guatemala, Peru, and Uruguay; countries appearing for the first time include Indonesia and Romania.

The show will be divided into several sections: Galleries, the main section; Nova, which features young galleries showing work created in the past three years by up to three artists; Positions, devoted to solo showcases of emerging galleries or artists; and Survey, which focuses on work created before 2000. This year’s Meridians sector, which centers atypical projects, is being curated by Yasmil Raymond, until recently the director of Portikus and the rector of the Städelschule Academy of Fine Art, both in Frankfurt. The Kabinett section, focused on curated displays presented by galleries in a portion of their main booths, will return, as will the fair’s Conversations program, organized this year for the first time by arts writer and educator Kimberly Bradley. 

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News: NEWS | Christian Levett on creating Femmes Artistes du Musée de Mougins (FAMM), July  9, 2024

NEWS | Christian Levett on creating Femmes Artistes du Musée de Mougins (FAMM)

July 9, 2024

 

By Jessica Lack
July 4, 2024

Christian Levett on creating Femmes Artistes du Musée de Mougins (FAMM): ‘I needed the collection to tell a story, and that story is the birth of modern art’

The British collector explains how and why he decided to move on from antiquities to establish a museum for 19th- to 21st-century female artists — and why it made the mayor of Mougins cry.

There may come a time when a museum devoted entirely to female artists will be redundant — as strange as a museum for right-handed artists. However, in a world where modern art by women still makes up only about 11 per cent of major museum acquisitions, and where their paintings still cost a fraction of what their male contemporaries can command, the newly opened Femmes Artistes du Musée de Mougins (FAMM) is a vital addition to the canon.

Situated in the picturesque hilltop village of Mougins in the south of France, once home to Picasso and Francis Picabia, the privately owned FAMM is housed in a former museum of classical antiquity. More than 100 paintings and sculptures by more than 80 artists, spanning the period from 1870 to the present day, are closely spaced on four floors, creating an intimate atmosphere in which to see works by the likes of Berthe MorisotLeonora CarringtonJoan MitchellLee KrasnerShirin Neshat and Carrie Mae Weems

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News: REVIEW | Dorothy Dehner: A Retrospective in Sculpture Magazine, July  9, 2024 - Kay Whitney for Sculpture Magazine

REVIEW | Dorothy Dehner: A Retrospective in Sculpture Magazine

July 9, 2024 - Kay Whitney for Sculpture Magazine

Dorothy Dehner 

June 21, 2024 by Kay Whitney
New York
Berry Campbell Gallery 

My introduction to Dorothy Dehner’s sculpture came via a tiny photograph in a catalogue of David Smith’s work. Indeed, it has been Dehner’s fate until recently to exist as a footnote to Smith’s career. In a Smithsonian oral history from the 1960s, she described their 23-year marriage as both violent and loving; she also stated that it was impossible for two sculptors to exist in the same household. Her career didn’t begin until she was 56, after her divorce from Smith. And it is only now that her work—under-appreciated and rarely displayed despite its presence in major museum collections—is receiving the treatment it deserves in a sprawling and inclusive retrospective (on view through June 22, 2024) that reveals the scope of her talents.

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News: EVENT | Film Screening & Discussion: “Kindred Spirits: Artists Hilda Wilkinson Brown and Lilian Thomas Burwell”, June 15, 2024

EVENT | Film Screening & Discussion: “Kindred Spirits: Artists Hilda Wilkinson Brown and Lilian Thomas Burwell”

June 15, 2024

Film Screening & Discussion:

“Kindred Spirits: Artists Hilda Wilkinson Brown and Lilian Thomas Burwell”

On Saturday, June 29th at 12:00pm, join us at the Smithsonian Anacostia Community Museum for a screening and discussion of the documentary film, “Kindred Spirits: Artists Hilda Wilkinson Brown and Lilian Thomas Burwell,” about the lives and work of two accomplished but unsung Washington-based African American artists who were united by their love for each other, their dedication to their art, and their passion for teaching. Hilda Wilkinson Brown (1894-1981) graduated from M Street High School (later known as Dunbar), earned her BA from Howard University and MA from Columbia University, and then served as head of art education at Miner Teachers College for nearly 40 years. Her niece Lilian Thomas Burwell (1927-) attended Dunbar High School, Pratt Institute, DC Teachers’ College, and Catholic University, and later taught in the DC Public Schools, including at Duke Ellington School of the Arts.

The film will be followed by a discussion with:

Saturday, June 29th
12:00pm-2:00pm
Smithsonian Anacostia Community Museum
1901 Fort Place SE, Washington, DC 20020

REGISTER HERE (recommended, but not required): https://www.eventbrite.com/e/film-screening-discussion-kindred-spirits-tickets-917410187567

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News: ARTICLE | Four Overlooked Women Abstract Expressionists Are Spotlighted in London, June 14, 2024 - Jo Lawson-Tancred for Artnet

ARTICLE | Four Overlooked Women Abstract Expressionists Are Spotlighted in London

June 14, 2024 - Jo Lawson-Tancred for Artnet

 

a black and white photograph of a middle aged woman standing in front of a painting.
 
Four Overlooked Women Abstract Expressionists Are Spotlighted in London

The exhibition shows how the principles of Abstract Expression

Perle Fine 

Perle Fine in her New York studio in c. 1963. Photo: Maurice Berezov, courtesy of Perle Fine Estate and Gazelli Art House, © AE Artworks.

Born in Boston in 1905 to Russian immigrant parents, Fine showed an early interest in art and moved to New York in her early twenties to pursue an education at the Art Students League. There she opted to study under the renowned German-born artist Hans Hofmann, who was instrumental in developing the formal breakthroughs that defined European movements like Cubism into a more gestural, expressive style. Over time, Fine cultivated a number of high-profile collectors including Museum of Modern Art founding director Alfred Barr, art director and publisher Emily Hall Tremaine, and architect Frank Lloyd Wright, but also supported her practice by working as a gallerist.

By 1945, Fine had developed an interest in nonrepresentational art and joined the American Abstract Artists group. Five years later, Willem de Kooning nominated her to join “the Club,” a members-only meeting place on 8th Street where a tight-knit community of artists met to socialize, plan, and debate. The group selected her to participate in the historic Ninth Street Show, which featured artists like Philip Guston, Elaine de Kooning, Joan Mitchell, Robert Motherwell, and Barnett Newman; the show established Abstract Expressionism as a major American art movement. Fine exhibited in all six of the subsequent annual invite-only exhibitions until 1957.

In 1968, Fine noted that collage helped her learn how construct a composition. “When you do something to that white paper, when you put one or two forms on that white paper, that simple sheet of white paper can become one of the most beautiful things in the world if those forms are put in there in such a way as to involve every inch of that from top to bottom and from left to right,” she said. “Which is something I never was as aware of as when I worked this out in collage and later in painting. So that another great truth about art was revealed to me in this way!”

After many years living with Alzheimer’s, Fine died of pneumonia aged 83 on May 31, 1988.

FULL ARTICLE LINK

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