News

News: Mary Dill Henry's Life-long Search for the "Vital Forces" of Art and Technology, February  5, 2023 - Zach Mortice for Metropolis Magazine

Mary Dill Henry's Life-long Search for the "Vital Forces" of Art and Technology

February 5, 2023 - Zach Mortice for Metropolis Magazine

A newly resurfaced archive of Mary Dill Henry’s photographs, sketches, and correspondence at the Illinois Institute of Technology reveals an artist always in motion.

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News: Upcoming Exhibition | The Church at Sag Harbor: A Return to a Place By the Sea, February  4, 2023

Upcoming Exhibition | The Church at Sag Harbor: A Return to a Place By the Sea

February 4, 2023

A Return to a Place By the Sea

February 5 - May 27, 2023

Opening Reception February 4 | 6-7:30PM

Return to A Place By the Sea revisits and recontextualizes the 1999 exhibition A Place By the Sea that celebrated the work and friendship of four African American artists: Nanette Carter (b. 1954), Gregory Coates (b. 1961), Al Loving (1935-2005), and Frank Wimberley (b.1926). Initially organized in 1999 by Jim Richard Wilson at the Rathbone Gallery of the Russell Sage College in Albany, the show traveled to Christine Nienaber Contemporary Art in New York and the Arlene Bujese Gallery in East Hampton. This February, thanks to the combined curation of The Church's Co-Founder April Gornik and Chief Curator Sara Cochran, we will explore the type of art these artists were making in the 1990s and update this conversation by exploring their more recent work. Our goal is to deepen the understanding of these influential artists, who have only begun to receive international acclaim for their work. The show also delineates a more inclusive history of abstract painting in New York in the late 20th century and looks beyond the historical standard of race and gender. Uniting some works from the original show with recent paintings, works on paper, and sculpture, Return to A Place By the Sea highlights the relevancy of each artist of "The Eastville Four." Given that for a time, all four artists lived part of the year in the Eastville/ SANS neighborhood to the east of Sag Harbor, this exhibition further honors the tradition of Sag Harbor as a maker's place of diverse art, industry, and craft practices.

Carter, Coates, Loving, and Wimberley shared a deep kinship. They were committed to abstract painting and shared an appreciation of jazz music with its vitality and basis in spontaneity and experimentation. Their lives and work were intertwined by their associations with The Studio Museum in Harlem, the Cinque Gallery in New York where they showed their work, and the Eastville Community where they have summer homes and found space to work and relax. The exhibition will feature programming that spotlights each artist and new video interviews with Carter, Coates, and Wimberley.

Join us for the opening on Saturday, February 4th, from 6-7:30 PM.

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News: IN CONVERSATION: The Art of Frederick J. Brown: A Conversation with Lowery Stokes Sims & Bentley Brown (Virtual), February  1, 2023

IN CONVERSATION: The Art of Frederick J. Brown: A Conversation with Lowery Stokes Sims & Bentley Brown (Virtual)

February 1, 2023

Join us for a virtual conversation that delves into the artistic practice of Frederick J. Brown with noted American art historian and curator Lowery Stokes Sims, who contributed a new essay to Frederick J. Brown: A Drawing in Five Parts, and the artist’s son, Bentley Brown, Adjunct Professor of Art History at Fordham University and PhD Fellow, NYU Institute of Fine Arts. The conversation is moderated by Director and CEO Masha Turchinsky.

Register

 

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News: ArtTable: Intersect Palm Springs Private Tour & Reception , January 27, 2023 - ArtTable

ArtTable: Intersect Palm Springs Private Tour & Reception

January 27, 2023 - ArtTable


Mary Dill Henry, Here Comes the Sun, 1972, acrylic on canvas, 48 x 72 inches.

ArtTable

Private Tour & Reception at Intersect Palm Springs
Saturday, February 11, 2023
11:00 AM

Please join us for a day at Intersect Palm Springs! Current and prospective members and guests are welcome to join for a special private tour of the fair with Liza Shapiro and Georgia PowellCo-Founders of CURA Art. Afterwards, stick around for a meet-and-greet with ArtTable’s Lila Harnett Executive Director, Jessica L. Porter, and learn more about ArtTable’s mission and how you can get more involved with the organization.

Intersect Palm Springs is an art and design fair that brings together a dynamic mix of modern and contemporary galleries, and is activated by timely and original programming. It is one of three annual cultural events produced by Intersect Art and Design, in addition to Intersect Aspen and SOFA Chicago. Each event connect galleries with art lovers and collectors, highlighting art and design locally, regionally, and globally. Overseen by Managing Director Becca Hoffman, the Intersect team is committed to building community and connectivity in the locations of the fairs. Through cultural partners, programming, and curatorial vision, Intersect offers year-round opportunities for dialogue, engagement, and inspiration.

Register

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News: UPCOMING EVENT | Mike Solomon: 10 x 10 - Ten Slides Ten Speakers, Sarasota Art Museum, January 26, 2023 - Sarasota Art Museum

UPCOMING EVENT | Mike Solomon: 10 x 10 - Ten Slides Ten Speakers, Sarasota Art Museum

January 26, 2023 - Sarasota Art Museum

10 x 10: Ten Slides, Ten Speakers
January 26, 2023
Reception: 5:30 - 6:00 PM
Presentations: 6:00 - 7:00 PM
Sarasota Art Museum, Florida

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News: UPCOMING EVENT | ART TALK: Mike Solomon, Arts Advocates Gallery, January 26, 2023 - Arts Advocates Gallery

UPCOMING EVENT | ART TALK: Mike Solomon, Arts Advocates Gallery

January 26, 2023 - Arts Advocates Gallery

Art Talk: Mike Solomon
Arts Advocates Gallery, Sarasota, Florida
January 27, 2023
4:00 - 6:00 PM
More Information

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News: Dr. Klaus Ottmann Discusses Cover Art & Legacy of James Brooks, January 19, 2023 - David Taylor for Dan's papers

Dr. Klaus Ottmann Discusses Cover Art & Legacy of James Brooks

January 19, 2023 - David Taylor for Dan's papers

Following our unorthodox cover last week, the January 13, 2023 cover of Dan’s Papers features a piece by late East End painter James Brooks (1906–1992).

The Missouri-born, Texas-raised and New York-settled painter is best remembered for his 1940 mural in the Marine Air Terminal at LaGuardia Airport, for his status as one of the Irascible 18 abstract expressionists who protested a 1950 modern art show at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and for his home/studio in Springs, once shared with his artist wife Charlotte Park, that’s now considered one of America’s 11 most endangered historic places.

The art on this week’s cover, a 1982 painting titled “Eastern,” was provided to us by the Parrish Art Museum in Water Mill, long ahead of the painting’s inclusion in the upcoming exhibition James Brooks: A Painting Is a Real Thing, scheduled to debut at the museum on August 6.

Guest curated by Dr. Klaus Ottmann, the exhibition will be a “comprehensive survey of significant scope comprised of some 50 paintings drawn from public and private U.S. collections,” according to the museum’s website.

The show offers an overdue retrospective of the artist’s fascinating four-decade career and diverse range of art styles, as well as an insightful 125-page catalogue featuring a chronology, bibliography and interpretive essays by Ottmann and other experts.

We spoke to Ottmann about the cover art, Brooks’ career and the August exhibition at the Parrish Art Museum.

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News: The Tom Brady of Other Jobs, January  3, 2023 - Francesca Paris for The New York Times

The Tom Brady of Other Jobs

January 3, 2023 - Francesca Paris for The New York Times


Lilian Thomas Burwell
Photo: Lexey Swall

The Tom Brady of Other Jobs

Meet the people as old in their jobs as Tom Brady is in his: the oldest 1 percent of the work force, across a range of professions.
By Francesca Paris
Dec. 24, 2022

In the National Football League, Tom Brady is a very old man. When he takes the field Sunday night — with his Tampa Bay Buccaneers still hoping to make the postseason — he will be 45.4 years old, six years older than the next-oldest starter in the N.F.L. and the oldest starting quarterback in the league for the seventh season in a row.

In a league where most quarterbacks last about four seasons, Mr. Brady is in his 23rd. It is safe to call him the top 1 percent in terms of age for starting quarterbacks, or even the top 0.1 percent. He is, himself, the end of the distribution.

There are many ways to contemplate Mr. Brady’s age, but the best one may be to look outside the sports arena, comparing him with aging workers still going strong in other professions.

Starting at quarterback at 45 is akin to being a family doctor well into his ninth decade. It’s like being an emergency medical technician — a job that requires running up stairs and lifting bodies on stretchers — at age 70. Or an artist in her 90s, a logger in his 80s or a biologist in her 70s.

We know this because the Census Bureau publishes detailed data about the composition of the American workforce, including age and occupation. Using this information, we set out to find a group of American workers who occupy the same part of the age distribution in their professions as Mr. Brady does in his.

We found nine such people from around the United States, and we asked them why, like Mr. Brady, they can’t seem to quit.

Of course, there is no such thing as a Super Bowl of baking, or an All-Pro team of the country’s logging foremen. There is no Most Valuable Bean Biologist award, though perhaps there should be. We do not claim that these workers are the greatest of all time at what they do. On the other hand, having talked extensively with them, we cannot rule it out.

Meet them, and decide for yourself:

Lilian Burwell recently had an exhibition in New York that drew so much attention that, as she puts it, she’s been making “real money.”

“I can’t keep up with myself anymore!” she said.

At 95, that’s how so many things in her life feel, including her art: still new, after all this time.

“It’s like it comes through me,” she said. “Not from me.”

She knew as a child in New York City during the Great Depression that she had to follow her instinct to create art.

Her parents thought she had lost her mind.

“They said, ‘You can’t make a living like that!’ Especially because of the racial prejudice,” she recalled.

“And I said, ‘But that hasn’t anything to do with it.’”

They compromised. She became an art teacher, then a teacher of art teachers. Each day, she hurried home from work to make her own art, which has since been exhibited from Baltimore to Italy. If creating was magical, teaching might’ve been even more delightful: It was like “throwing a pebble in the water,” with the result — her students’ lives — out of her control.

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